Tag Archives: ant ecology

No Place Like Home: the Comanche Harvester Ant in the Cross Timbers

I had  a short paper published in the frist issue of Post Oak and Prairie Journal (January 2015). In this paper, I highlight some natural history work that did not make it into my dissertation on the Comanche harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex comanche). I plan to follow up on this work in the near future.

The paper is titled: No Place Like Home: the Comanche Harvester Ant in the Cross Timbers. (Notice that my photo of a Comanche harvester ant made the cover — such a great Cover Girl!)

The Cross Timbers Ecoregion occurs in Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, and perhaps Arkansas, where the eastern forests grade into the drier western grasslands and desert. This region is characterized by a mosaic of oak forests and prairie — which is exactly the mosaic of habitats the Comanche harvester ant likes. I believe that the Comanche harvester ant is an important part of this ecosystem in part because they nest only in the prairie but forage into the woods, thereby connecting these different habitats. In the near future, I plan to investigate how Comanche and other ants play a role in this dynamic ecoregion.

 

Ant Presence and Abundance in the Fort Worth Nature Center

I sampled ants using pitfall traps in 17 sites in the Fort Worth Nature Center monthly in June, July, and August 2012.

I used CANOCO to run redundancy analyses (RDA) on ant presence with abiotic and biotic environmental variables and on ant presence and abundance with soil type to look for ant preference for soil. I used forward selection of variables and Monte Carlo significance tests to select the variables for the final RDA models.

RESULTS

1) RDA for ant presence and environmental variables

RDA Summary Table

Axes

1

2

3

4

Total variance

 Eigenvalues                     

0.122

0.062

0.026

0.014

1.000

Species-environment correlations

0.820

0.872

0.672

0.582

Cumulative percentage variance of species data

12.2

18.4

21.0

22.4

Cumulative percentage variance of species-environment relation 

51.5

77.6

88.8

94.5

Sum of all eigenvalues     

1.000

Sum of all canonical eigenvalues     

0.237

Triplot

2) RDA for ant presence and soil type

RDA Summary Table

Axes                                    1      2      3      4 Total variance
Eigenvalues

0.076

0.023

0.011

0.007

1.000

Species-environment correlations 

0.788

0.603

0.424

0.417

Cumulative percentage variance    of species data

7.6

9.9

11.0

11.7

Cumulative percentage variance    of species-environment relation 65.2   84.9   93.8 100.0
Sum of all eigenvalues

1.000

Sum of all canonical eigenvalues

0.117

Triplot

3) RDA for ant abundance and soil type

RDA Summary Table

Axes                                    1      2      3      4 Total variance
Eigenvalues

0.070

0.031

0.016

0.003

1.000

Species-environment correlations 

0.777

0.655

0.456

0.265

Cumulative percentage variance    of species data

7.0

10.1

11.7

12.0

Cumulative percentage variance    of species-environment relation

58.4

84.6

97.9

100.0

Sum of all eigenvalues

1.000

Sum of all canonical eigenvalues

0.120

Triplot

24% of species presence is explained by the environmental variables with percent litter cover and drainage being the significant variables. Sampling sites by date clumped together indicating a lack of seasonality — which seems a bit unusual since late July and August become quite hot and ant activity seems reduced  at this time.

12% of species presence was explained by soil type with the Aquilla soil being the only significant soil. This soil is the only soil type where the Comanche harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex comanche) is found. All other species are more generalist with respect to soil type.

7.4% of species abundance was explained by soil type again with the Aquilla soil being the only significant soil. This result further supports the result with species presence: only the Comanche harvester ant has such narrow soil preference.

CONCLUSIONS

Though the eigenvalues are low this is not unusual for ecological data. The low level of explanatory value of these variables is likely due to the generalist nature of these species (and more temperate species in general) and the below-ground nesting of most ant species.

The Comanche harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex comanche) was the only species to show strict preference for soil type. Exactly what this species’ preference or requirement is remains unresolved.